Saturday, March 23, 2013

A Brush With Greatness

Dear Heavens! I'm turning into one of my art teachers with these bad puns!!! LOL! :) Here's another still life composition I did a couple of weeks back.

A Brush With Greatness
Coloured pencils on regular cartridge paper.
Roughly A3 size.

4 comments:

  1. Your work with colored pencils is so incredibly life-like. That lynx you are working on is BEAUTIFUL. How do you get the white (like the whiskers) to show up over color you've already put down?

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  2. Thanks soulsis! Can you tell coloured pencils are first artistic love and the thing I am most proficient with? LOL!
    There are a few ways of getting the whites to show up. The easiest way is to leave the highlighted area white and not go over them with colour. When you're dealing with fine lines (like the whiskers on my lynx), a good way to handle these is to find the spots where they are going to appear, cover them with tracing paper (so you can see what you're doing underneath) and then taking a pencil and lightly scoring the paper. When you go over the area with light layers of colours, they won't leach into the creases. Another way is to remove the colour if you've mistakenly applied it to an area that should've been white. Use some low tack Magic Tape, place in on the spot you want to remove the colour, and then use a pencil and mark out the areas that should be white. When you remove the tape, the coloured pigment goes with it. You could also use frisket, also known as Masking Fluid and paint the areas that are to be left white, but you can't leave frisket on too long or you might rip the paper off when you remove it. If the paper is thick and strong enough to handle a bit of roughness and the colours you've applied is quite thick and burnished, you can use a very sharp x-acto knife and scrape back the colours to reveal the white, but it's a bit tricky and you can end up ruining your drawing if you don't do it correctly (or if the tip of the blade is too dull). Hope these little tricks help. :)

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  3. Hmmm... I've never heard of tracing paper; it seems like a good idea (ie. safest for the beginner like me!). I showed Richard the brushes drawing and he swore it was a photo. Then I showed him the lynx you were doing and he said no way was that drawn. I had to enlarge it to show him the detail on it before he believed it was done by hand. He told me to tell you to quit taking classes and go out and teach them, lol. :)

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  4. You can buy tracing paper in art stores and (if I'm not mistaken) in office supplies stores. It's "see through" and used for... Well... Tracing. :)
    **BLUSH** If my art tricks people into believing it's a photo, then I've achieved my goal. You can quote me on that one. :) LOL!

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